Tag Archives: Nook

You Have Options!

Do you really need a specific eBook reader?
The most inexpensive eBook reader will still cost you around $80.00, and it will not have all the bells and whistles. Within a year, there will be a newer model out.

 It will be limited by the format it uses. You will be bound to buying from the source store, be it Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Kobo, etc.
If you are a collector of electronic toys, you will find yourself juggling your personal cell phone, work phone (many agency workers are issued work phones), your eBook reader, and your tablet as well as all the assorted accessories that go with those.

Sales of eBook readers have declined in the last year. Traditional publishers have rushed to claim the death of the eBook and the resurgence of the printed book. The truth is far different. Readers are reading eBooks more and more on other devices!
My daughter tells me that her Nook lies somewhere in the house, forgotten. She now reads mostly on her iPhone. It’s big enough, doesn’t take much space in her purse, and books are at fingertip’s reach with the iBookstore. She has loaded the Kindle App on it, giving her access to Kindle books as well.

If you don’t mind the smaller screen, your best option may be reading from your phone, especially if you are a young reader with great eyesight, and you have a larger screen on your phone. I find it difficult to read from my phone.
Other readers are opting to use their tablets as eBook readers. With an ever-growing number of reading Apps available for tablets, you can actually access every format and eBook seller.
These alternatives allow you to download books from non-seller sites that are sources of Free books, sites such as openculture.com and gutenberg.org (Project Gutenberg). These sites offer free classics by authors such as Jane Austen and Charles Dickens in PDF or ePub format.
The benefits of adding reading Apps to your tablet are many. The tablet is a multi-use device. Its screen is larger than a phone’s screen and easier on the eyes. A tablet is not likely to need replacement in a year. Storage capacity may be higher in a tablet.
Most importantly, you can load several reading Apps to include every format available: in one device you can read Mobi, ePub, PDF, DOC, etc. Finally, you are not stuck carrying around a cell phone, a reader, and a tablet.
One reading App that is totally Free to download and extremely useful is Adobe Digital Editions (ADE). It will read both EPUB and EPUB3 as well as PDF. It works in multiple languages. It can be used to borrow books from many public libraries.  It comes in versions for Apple, PC, and Android. The only con is that it does not read Kindle formats.

A reading App you might try is FBReader. It is also Free and handles all the major formats to include EPUB and AZW (Kindle). It comes for all platforms: Mac, Win, Android, and Linux!
Another reading App for Android that is available totally free is PocketBook. It handles multiple formats to include both EPUB and Kindle.
CoolReaderis free (with in-app purchases), no ads. It also opens major formats EPUB and Mobi.
You do not need a Kindle reader to download Amazon books.
You can load the Kindle App to your phone or tablet, and the App is available for Android, Win, and Apple.

Remember that most Apps will not open DRM protected books. The Apps I’ve mentioned are totally free to you. There are no purchases necessary, most show no ads, and all functionality is included for free. You can have as many as you want on your device.

There are dozens of reading Apps available to you. Some are very good, but the FREE versions give you limited functionality, forcing you to pay for the fully-functional Apps. Most free ones are loaded with ads. The ones I featured are free, fully functional, and supposedly ad free.
Adobe Digital Editions
FBReader
PocketBook
 CoolReader
Kindle App
Nook App
Kobo App

Calibre is for Readers!

Calibre is a Free App that every eBook owner should have. As a reader, I get great mileage out of Calibre.
Kobo, Nook, iBooks, all use ePub format, but Kindle does not. If you own a Kindle, you might buy a book on a great sale from Kobo or Barnes & Noble, but Kindle will not open it. Likewise, if you own a Nook reader or a Kobo, you are limited to buying books from them because they will not open a Kindle book.
      
There is a solution to this problem, as you will see. A book I wanted was on 50% sale at the Kobo site. No problem. I signed into Kobo and bought the book. The book was saved to the Kobo library for my account.
I went into my Kobo Library, selected the new book, and clicked on export. The book was downloaded to my download directory on my desktop. I signed off Kobo.

I navigated to my download directory. I clicked on the book. My FREE Adobe Digital Editions app on my desktop opened it. It now appeared in the Adobe Digital Editions library directory. Adobe Digital Editions is another very useful FREE app.

I opened my Calibre program and imported the ePub file from the Adobe Digital Editions directory into Calibre. I used Calibre to convert the ePub into Mobi, and emailed the Mobi file to my Kindle. The whole process took five minutes, and I was reading the book on my Kindle!

Books that you get from Barnes & Noble, Kobo, and most sellers, (including Amazon), are often DRM protected. This is especially true of books from traditional publishers.

This means that when you try to open the book in a reader for which it was not sold, the warning you see below pops up. You are unable to open the book.

The book I bought from Kobo was DRM protected. Since I paid for the book, and all I wanted was to be able to read it, I opted to remove the DRM.
In order to open the ePub book and convert it to Mobi, Calibre must remove the DRM first. It must have the right plugin installed to do so. Good news is that Calibre and its plugins are all FREE and widely available on the internet.

You can spend money buying the DRM removal tools, but that would be foolish when the best of them are available for FREE as open source apps. DRM can be removed from Nook, Kobo, and Kindle books using these Calibre plugins.
Calibre is also a fantastic reader, organizer, and manager for books. It can organize your books in just about any order you want. It can open dozens of file formats. It can convert from just about any format into another.

If you try to convert from one format to another and you can’t, you can usually find a plugin that will enable you to do the task.

Another great advantage of the app is that you can use it to copy books from your Kindle to the computer or portable drive and vice versa. There are also internet instructions on how to transfer books from Calibre to your iPad.

Calibre is made for Windows, Mac, and Linux! If you are a user of, let’s say Ubuntu, you can download Calibre straight from your Ubuntu apps manager.

You can get a Dropbox account and back up your Calibre library so you can access it from any device. I have my Calibre library also stored in an external drive. You might think that is silly, but you never know what companies like Amazon, Kobo, Barnes & Noble may do in the future.

Your books should be forever yours. I am paranoid about sellers going out of business or denying me the books I paid for, in the future, for whatever reason.

I have not even touched the tip of the iceberg in terms of what Calibre can do. I honestly can say that it is the most useful tool I can have both as a reader. I could write another post on how useful it is to me as a writer.
No, I do not work for Calibre nor make any money from recommending it.  I benefit from the app and feel every reader should too. It is an Open Source App; this means that it is totally FREEEE!!!!
         Adobe Digital Editions
                Great Site for DRM Plugins
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